Version

Get All DCs in the Entire Forest

Getting a know a new environment for a new client and I a quickly needed information about all domain controllers in the entire forest.

Wrote a small little script to provide me all the information I needed:

 

Get .Net Framework Version for the .DLL & .EXE files

Working with many app/dev teams it is hard to find which version of Dot Net  an application was designed or made in.

Now if your application server has multiple drives and depending on which drive the application resides it may be hard to find this information.

Let’s assume there are two drives C: and D:.

We will start with D: drive as it is easy.

Now the C: drive is a little more work. The above method wont work because C:  drive has system files and depending on your rights you may not have access to them.

You may get the following error:

But there is a way we can get this accomplished. Good old dos commands to the rescue! We are basically going to get a list of .exe and .dll files from the C: drive and then run the above code against it.

Lets capture the files:

Now we have the .EXE files stored in C_EXE_Paths.txt and we query it for .NET versions and save the output to DotNetFiles_C_EXE.txt

Similarly we have the .DLLfiles stored in C_DLL_Paths.txt and we query it for .NET versions and save the output to DotNetFiles_C_DLL.txt

You might get errors for files that do not meet criteria or fails to list .Net version.

This can be surpressed by using:

The output would be similar to:

Now you can import this in Excel and go crazy!  😉

Additionally, if you want to detect what version of .NETis installed on your server here is a cool utility (ASoft .NET Version Detector) to get you the info, as well as download links to the installer in case you need to download and install.

The Lazy Way To Do Active Directory Inventory

From time to time admins have to run an inventory of what is running in the AD environment. This is a good practice for audits, inventory, removing decommissioned servers, or any other good reason. The details that are required are like when was computer/ server created, when was it last logged into, what is the OS, Service Pack, and OU details if any organization was done in structuring the OU.

Luckily PowerShell can provide all of that information in a nice .csv file which can be later edited in Excel to do filtering as needed.

Open up PowerShell in Admin mode on the DC or create a session if doing this remotely.

Result: